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Friday, April 03, 2009

Dot-NET to benefit from Sun sale?

At the AIIM show this week, I talked to a number of consultants and others who told tales of an uptick, recently, in .NET-based CMS business. One potential buyer wanted to know who the top .NET players in ECM are. There seemed to be a lot of interest, generally, in .NET-based content management. I can confirm that one software vendor whose .NET CMS has been around for years has been experiencing strong business in the recession.

It occurred to me that the much-talked-about (but slow to happen) acquisition of Sun by IBM, combined with the increasing entropy level around Java 7, may be giving IT decisionmakers a bit of stomach acid right now. Smaller shops with a significant existing investment in Microsoft infrastructure seem to see this as a good time to stop "thinking in Java." One consultant told me that a recent customer went with a .NET system based on the ability to get a usable delpoyment up and running quickly. The unspoken sentiment seemed to be "Who has time for Java EE?"

Bottom line: Acquisitions are disruptive. They put fence-sitters back on the fence, and they may others jump in unexpected directions. With Java, you also have uncertainty around the next edition. (Will there be a Java 7 any time soon? Doubtful.) These are not good things if you're Sun. But it's not a bad environment for Microsoft. Not bad at all.

3 comments:

  1. Anonymous9:26 AM

    .NET is better anyway! :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. Strange. I might think that the cheaper Linux+J2EE would win in these times. And, in my opinion, who cares what Java 7 will be, until it the binary compatibility is ensured. .NET is around for several years now, still its platform support is weaker.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Java's fate is out of the hands of Sun or IBM. The community around it is much larger than either of those companies and anyone who makes decisions about Java based on IBM-Sun rumors isn't doing their job right.

    Oddly enough, if the tables were turned and it was Microsoft in a difficult position, we couldn't say the same things about .NET.

    ReplyDelete

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